Your Photography Business: Sell Without Being Pushy

AS SEEN IN

Photography Business Institute
Photography Business Institute

As small business owners we’re pleasers. We want our clients to be thrilled when they buy from us, not feel like they were tricked or pushed into something they didn’t want.

What I find when talking to small business owners is that one of their biggest fears is being seen by their clients as a pushy, high pressure salesman. Because of that fear, we often err on the side of being too lax in the sales process. We let the client take charge of the order instead of being the expert they hired us to be.

We think they must know what they want. After all they came to me in the first place so they know what I do. I’ll just let them tell me how I can best meet their needs.

But the thing is, with most purchases there are so many options your clients don’t know the extent of what can best meet their needs. They are going with the referral from their friend or what seems the least complicated or maybe even whatever they have heard is the most popular or highest rated. And if you want to let them make a decision based on those criteria, that works. But you’re not a boutique business then and you are putting yourself in a position to be seen as a commodity. The uniqueness of YOU is not a part of their buying decision when you let your clients tell you what they want (an 8″ x 10″ print for the living room, please).

Your expertise, your years of experience and your time and talent don’t matter as much when you’re just the person taking their order, running their credit card and letting them walk out the door with their purchase. You haven’t helped them make that purchase really. You’ve just facilitated a transaction.

When it comes to selling, you can sell without being high pressure and thrill your clients with incredible images for their homes.

Why Networking with Other Businesses is a Must for Photographers

The business world loves the term networking. While it can be thrown around as a buzzword, when you break it down, it simply means making connections and building relationships. While networking is a part of many jobs, it is essential for professional photographers...

The Portrait Photographer’s Guide to Keeping Up With Trends

Who remembers the boom of selective coloring in the early 2000s? Everywhere you looked, you'd see black and white images but for a pop of red in the subject's shoes or a vivid, bright bouquet colored by hand with colored pencils. Trends come and go in all creative...